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Five Lessons Learned - So Far!

Updated: Jan 9


After receiving my MFA (Sculpture) degree in the late 1970’s, I was pulled into the business world – before I knew it, I was in the midst of a successful and fulfilling profession in public relations and communications. In 2018, I re-launched my art career after this 40+ year hiatus. Here’s what I’ve learned – so far:


1. THE MORE I EXPERIMENT AND TRY NEW THINGS, the better the art work. It’s amazing how freeing it is to experiment with new techniques, materials, and colors. This practice broadens my vision and opens me to new possibilities. Even though a ‘tried and true’ way may produce an acceptable result, it’s pushing through from the known into the unknown where I find my vision is realized – and get a better result.

2. YAY! I WILL NOT KNOW HOW A PIECE WILL TURN OUT – I may THINK I know what it will look like but translating a sketch into a finished 3-D paper sculpture is a total mystery. I have learned to keep questioning the work, standing back for perspective, and walking away when I’m not sure. The more I question, the better the outcome, which is NEVER like the original – this, for me, is one of the most thrilling aspects of making art.

3. LOOKING AT OTHER ARTISTS’ WORK (both contemporary artists and masters) is essential. By viewing other artists’ work, I exercise my creative thinking and learn about their vision and inspiration. For me, it’s not a question of copying their artwork: we are different people with our own history and perceptions. But looking at their creations and feeling their expression pushes me to ask myself what I see and feel, such essential tools for making my own art.

4. INSPIRATION CAN COME FROM ANYWHERE – a photo, a morning walk, a conversation, a book, someone else’s creation – I never know where I will find it. And when I am inspired, it is thrilling to jump into the creative process and actualize it.

5. REAL CHANGE IS EXCITING, as resistant as I am to it! As my 3-D artwork evolves and real change occurs, I am compelled to re-think, evaluate, assess, and learn – which can sometimes be stressful and gut-wrenching, but so necessary in the creative process.

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